Organizational Inquiries

Do you have any student jobs or scholarships?

We occasionally hire undergraduate and graduate students to work in the management office at Oregon State University. These positions have included web and graphic design, publications, outreach and capacity building, and general office assistance. All positions are posted on our Opportunities page on our website.

AquaFish publishes a monthly newsletter listing available postdoctoral fellowships, jobs, and short courses in the US and around the world. This publication, entitled EdOpNet, is free of charge and is available via email. Visit the EdOpNet page on our website to look for opportunities and subscribe to the EdOpNet listserv.

I wish to find employment related to aquaculture. Does AquaFish have any jobs available?

We occasionally hire staff to work in our program management office at Oregon State University. When available, these positions are posted at the OSU job board: http://oregonstate.edu/jobs/. Our organization also publishes a monthly newsletter listing available postdoctoral fellowships, jobs, and short courses in the US and around the world. This publication, entitled EdOpNet, is free of charge and is available via email. Visit the EdOpNet page on our website to look for opportunities and subscribe to the EdOpNet listserv.

I am interested in an internship with an AquaFish researcher. Would this be possible?

Because our organization is decentralized, the management office is not always aware of internship opportunities or needs among our collaborating researchers. Your most effective course of action is to review our Research Projects page. From there, you can see which institutions we work with and find names of specific partners in Implementation Plans and Technical Reports, among other documents. These will help you determine which research areas and interests are in line with your own. You can then contact the specific researcher directly with your proposal.

I have read a number of AquaFish technical reports on your website, and I have follow-up questions that I would like to ask. How can I contact the appropriate person to discuss my questions? How can I contact the appropriate person to discuss my questions?

AquaFish researchers are actively working in their fields of expertise and would be glad to engage with you further. Once you have the names of the authors (principal investigators), you can find their contact information via their institutional website. If you are interested in contacting the authors of AquaFish peer-reviewed publications, you can find the authors contact information on the associated NOP.

I am a researcher in aquaculture, working at a university in [country] and I would like to become involved with AquaFish. How can I become a collaborator? Is my country eligible to receive USAID assistance?

Thank you for your interest. For the time being, our current AquaFish grant from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) ends in March 2018, and the period for submitting proposals under this grant has already passed. In other words, there is no opportunity for new partners to become formally involved in the program at this time. You are welcome, of course, to contact any AquaFish researchers to discuss possible future collaborations. You can find our partner institutions on our Research Projects page. The list of USAID-eligible countries is modified periodically, so checking the USAID website http://www.usaid.gov/ is always a good idea.

I read an AquaFish Implementation Plan and although I think the work has probably been completed by now, I can’t find the results on your website.

In general, results from AquaFish research will be available on our website with a delay of approximately six months for editing and production following the completion schedule noted in the Implementation Plan. In rare cases, research might be delayed because of unforeseen circumstances, and the results might not be published until the next annual reporting cycle. If you are not able to locate a specific report that you believe should already be available, please write to us through our Contact Form and we will confirm whether or not the report has been published.

I would like information regarding importation of [species name] to my country but there isn’t any information on your website.

As an organization funded by the US government, we are not able to provide advice or consultation services regarding importation or other issues relating to commercial operations. Your best approach might be to check with the commerce and the wildlife ministries or agencies of your country’s government to see if they are able to provide you with practical information regarding importation. It is equally important for you to become knowledgeable about the relevant national regulations in your country, especially as they might include information on potentially invasive species.

Please send me all the information you have regarding AquaFish research on [topic].

Unfortunately, it is not feasible for us to send you everything that we have on a specific topic. The best approach for satisfying your interests is for you to search the AquaFish website to find the specific reports that address your curiosity. There are a variety of publications, including reports, peer-reviewed journal articles, and manuals.

Getting Started in Aquaculture

How can I get started in freshwater shrimp aquaculture?

AquaFish and other related programs (Aquaculture CRSP and PD/A CRSP) have sponsored research on freshwater shrimp aquaculture in the past. The reports resulting from this research may be more technical than you are looking for, but you can access them on the Programmatic Information page as well as at http://pdacrsp.oregonstate.edu/pubs/.

If you are interested in taking courses, there are several organizations that run short courses and workshops. You can keep up-to-date on when and where they are available by checking the AquaFish’s EdOpNet, a monthly publication that lists available postdoctoral fellowships, jobs, and short courses in the US and around the world. EdOpNet is free of charge. Visit the EdOpNet page on our website to look for opportunities and subscribe to the EdOpNet listserv.

Before beginning, you may also want to learn about environmental concerns associated with various types of aquaculture. To do this, you can contact at least two global organizations, the Global Aquaculture Alliance and the World Wildlife Fund.

Global Aquaculture Alliance: The mission of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) is “to promote responsible aquaculture practices through education, advocacy and demonstration.” The GAA has published the “Codes of Practice for Responsible Shrimp Farming,” a 40-page technical guide printed in both English and Spanish. You can visit the Global Aquaculture Alliance website at http://www.gaalliance.org. You can also sign up for MyGAA, which will allow you to post messages on discussion boards and connect with aquaculture experts around the world.

World Wildlife Fund: The World Wildlife Fund drafted the Shrimp Aquaculture Dialogues, which are global standards for certifying farmed shrimp products. The final standards will help minimize the key environmental and social impacts related to shrimp farming. Read more at https://www.worldwildlife.org/industries/farmed-seafood.

Another excellent resource, especially if you are in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. You can find a National Sea Grant extension specialist by visiting http://seagrant.noaa.gov/extension.

(Please note that with the exception of the AquaFish Publications and EdOpNet websites, the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

I would like to learn more about marine aquaculture.

AquaFish and previous related programs have conducted some research on specific marine species. You can access these reports through our Publications webpage.

If you are interested in taking courses, there are several organizations that run short courses and workshops. You can keep up-to-date on when and where they are available by checking the AquaFish’s EdOpNet, a monthly publication that lists available postdoctoral fellowships, jobs, and short courses in the US and around the world. EdOpNet is free of charge. Visit the EdOpNet page on our website to look for opportunities and subscribe to the EdOpNet listserv.

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute has assembled a panel of experts to evaluate marine aquaculture in the US. To get more information about this Marine Aquaculture Task Force, visit their website at http://www.whoi.edu/sbl/liteSite.do?litesiteid=2790&articleId=4439.

Another excellent resource, especially if you are in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. You can find a National Sea Grant extension specialist by visiting http://seagrant.noaa.gov/extension.

Also in the US, NOAA has an aquaculture program (http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/aquaculture/) and the USDA provides leadership and funding for aquaculture (https://www.usda.gov/topics/farming/aquaculture).

The Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/) promotes “responsible aquaculture through education, advocacy and demonstration.” You can sign up for MyGAA, which will allow you to post messages on discussion boards and connect with aquaculture experts around the world.

(Please note that with the exception of the AquaFish Publications and EdOpNet websites, the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

I am looking for information regarding health management strategies for finfish in earthen ponds.

Research performed by AquaFish participants has not addressed disease issues specifically. A good first step in your search would be to contact the tilapia discussion group at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/tilapia. Water quality testing is a subject that comes up frequently in the discussions. Also, because members come from all over the world, the design elements specific to your situation may already have been addressed. If you have a Yahoo email account, you can review the group's discussions over the past year or so. Better yet, you can post your query to the group, and the members will likely have some helpful information.

MyGAA, part of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/), offers discussion forums for members and can connect you to a network of aquaculture experts.

You can access AquaFish and other affiliated publications at our peer-reviewed publications webpage. The search function allows you to look for specific topics and authors that align with your interests.

Another excellent resource, especially if you are in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. You can find a National Sea Grant extension specialist by visiting http://seagrant.noaa.gov/extension.

(Please note that with the exception of the AquaFish webpages, the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

I need information about the early feeding of catfish (i.e., during the fry to fingerling stage).

AquaFish has conducted research on various catfish species. You can find reports on this research at Programmatic Reports page on our website. You may also find peer-reviewed publications on AquaFish (and previous programs) research. The search function allows you to look for specific topics and authors that align with your interests. The following websites may also offer help in addressing this issue:

University of Florida – http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa010
Mississippi State University – http://extension.msstate.edu/agriculture/catfish

Many links to aquaculture-related sites: http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/afsaqua.htm
World Aquaculture article – http://www.ca.uky.edu/wkrec/RVWFeedPractice.htm

Another excellent resource, especially if you are in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. You can find a National Sea Grant extension specialist by visiting http://seagrant.noaa.gov/extension.

MyGAA, part of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/), offers discussion forums for members and can connect you to a network of aquaculture experts.

(Please note that with the exception of the AquaFish webpages, the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

I want to build a pond for tilapia. What is the ideal size and depth of the pond?

So many factors affect the decisions on pond size and depth that this question does not have a simple answer. The CRSP published a booklet on Pond Fertilization, by Christopher Knud-Hansen, which describes this complex topic. The booklet is available at http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/Pnach582.pdf.

Here are some general points that are made by Knud-Hansen:

“There is no ideal size for a tilapia pond. If you have a very small pond (less than 100 square meters surface area), you may have problems with suspended solids in the water. Turbidity can decrease algal production, and excessive sedimentation can limit nutrient availability. On the other hand, a very large pond without sufficient depth can also have problems with suspended material from wind mixing.
“There is no ideal depth either. In general, most ponds should be at least 1 meter deep. Very shallow ponds may have problems with resuspended bottom sediments increasing turbidity of the water in the photic zone (where light can penetrate). This results in decreased algal productivity and, therefore, less natural food for the fish. Very deep ponds require more water and more labor to build.”
With regard to pond depth, at least two further points may be relevant: 1) Ponds that are more than 1 meter in depth are difficult for workers to work in, particularly when harvesting by seine, because seining requires them to walk on the pond bottom while pulling the seine; and 2) Sunlight typically does not penetrate beyond about 1 meter into a pond, so phytoplankton production below that depth is limited.

To access other publications that may be useful, please see Featured Titles.

Many of the decisions on pond size and depth must be based on the specifics of your land, water supply, budget, and plans. An excellent resource, especially if you are in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. You can find a National Sea Grant extension specialist by visiting http://seagrant.noaa.gov/extension.

MyGAA, part of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/), offers discussion forums for members and can connect you to a network of aquaculture experts.

(Please note that with the exception of the AquaFish and CRSP webpages, the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

Can you tell me how to raise oysters?

See Fact Sheet #SRAC 4302, "Oyster Hatchery Techniques," on the Southern Regional Aquaculture Center website: https://srac.tamu.edu/viewCategory/22.

(Please note that the above website link is not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope it is helpful, it is not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within the site.)

Will cage culture work on my farm or facility?

See Fact Sheet #SRAC 160, "What is Cage Culture," on the Southern Regional Aquaculture Center website: https://srac.tamu.edu/.

(Please note that the above website link is not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope it is helpful, it is not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within the site.)

How do I manage pH in my freshwater pond?

See Fact Sheet #SRAC 4604, "Managing High pH in Freshwater Ponds," on the Southern Regional Aquaculture Center website: https://srac.tamu.edu/viewCategory/25.

(Please note that the above website link is not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope it is helpful, it is not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within the site.)

How can I learn more about aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa?

SARNISSA (http://www.sarnissa.org/tiki-index.php), Sustainable Aquaculture Research Networks in Sub Saharan Africa, is an excellent resource for information on aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa. The website contains employment opportunities, recent publications, news, online forums, photos, videos, a student page, and more.

(Please note that the above website link is not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope it is helpful, it is not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within the site.)

The Business of Aquaculture

Can you help me start a tilapia farm?

Beginning an aquaculture venture has many challenges. It is an excellent idea to gather as much information as possible, to learn what regulations must be adhered to, and to speak with people who have had practical experience in the area.

Although AquaFish cannot directly assist you in developing a tilapia farm, we can provide some information that may be helpful. AquaFish and other related programs have sponsored research on many facets of tilapia aquaculture for years. You can access a wide range of publications, from reports to peer-reviewed manuscripts, at our Publications page.

Depending on where you are located, but especially for those of you in the United States, your nearest extension agent would likely be the most efficient way for you to start looking into this endeavor. These offices would be most familiar with local conditions and regulations and would also be able to tell you if anyone in your area has attempted this in the past. You can find a National Sea Grant extension specialist by visiting http://seagrant.noaa.gov/extension.

In addition, there are several aquaculture-oriented websites that provide support and information regarding starting up a farm, etc. The following list identifies several of these websites. (Please note, though, that the following sites are not supported by, endorsed by, or related to AquaFish):
World Aquaculture Society – https://www.was.org/
Sustainable Aquaculture Research Networks in Sub Saharan Africa – http://www.sarnissa.org/tiki-index.php

There are also numerous websites that provide general information on tilapia aquaculture or specific aspects of a tilapia aquaculture venture. The following links may be useful.

Free membership to a tilapia discussion group (with over 100 entries a month) at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/tilapia

The American Tilapia Association (ATA) website provides market information on tilapia along with a wealth of other tilapia information. The ATA home page is at http://www.americastilapiaalliance.org/ and the associated marketing page is at http://ag.arizona.edu/azaqua/ista/markets.htm.

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has collected resources regarding the business aspects of aquaculture at http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docaqua/financial.html.

Finally, you might consider joining MyGAA, part of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/). It will give you access to discussion forums for members and can connect you to a network of aquaculture experts.

(Please note that with the exception of the AquaFish webpages, the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

I am interested in the consumption of tilapia and other fish species in the US. My main interest is to secure market data, sales, volumes, and growth of the market. Can you help me?

Quite a bit of information about tilapia (and other species) markets in the United States and around the world is available on the internet. You may want to start with the American Tilapia Association, which has a web page of information about tilapia prices, markets, and imports, available at http://ag.arizona.edu/azaqua/ista/markets.htm.

For species other than tilapia, you might want to look at the Fish Information Service website at http://fis.com/. They report on markets and prices for many capture fisheries, but also have some information about farmed salmon, trout, shrimp, and other species. A username and password are required to access some information on this site.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also has information about US marine fisheries and aquaculture species at http://www.fishwatch.gov/.

The FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department also provides information on fisheries and aquaculture at http://www.fao.org/fishery/en.

Finally, you might consider joining MyGAA, part of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/). It will give you access to discussion forums for members and can connect you to a network of aquaculture experts.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

Our shrimp hatchery business is in need of technical and financial assistance. We would like to partner with AquaFish.

Thank you for your interest. AquaFish collaborates with research and education institutions to conduct research and promote sustainable aquaculture and fisheries development. We do not provide financial assistance.

You may contact AquaFish researchers listed on our website if their expertise is of interest to you. Many researchers serve as independent consultants and would be able to negotiate with you directly.

Please check out our website to get a better idea of the nature and purpose of AquaFish. The website identifies current projects, completed project reports, affiliated research institutions, and principal investigators.

Another excellent resource, especially if you are in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. You can find a National Sea Grant extension specialist by visiting http://seagrant.noaa.gov/extension.

MyGAA, part of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/), offers discussion forums for members and can connect you to a network of aquaculture experts.

(Please note that with the exception of the AquaFish homepage, the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

Our company is interested in purchasing a food grade or USP grade chemical called d-glucosamine, and we need about 100 kilo per month.

Thank you for checking with us, but unfortunately, AquaFish is not able to endorse, recommend, or supply commercial products. One resource that may be useful, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your needs with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. You can find a National Sea Grant extension specialist by visiting http://seagrant.noaa.gov/extension.

MyGAA, part of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/), offers discussion forums for members and can connect you to a network of aquaculture experts.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

Can you help me with information on solar powered aerators?

Although AquaFish has not conducted any directed research on solar-powered aerators, the AquaFish Director, Dr. Hillary Egna, has worked with the Biological and Ecological Engineering department at Oregon State University to mentor students in the development and implementation of solar-powered aeration systems in Africa. For more information on this project, go to http://aquafishcrsp.oregonstate.edu/news-events/ghana-aerator-team.

I am interested in producing trout feed and seek your help in finding information about modern technologies.

Providing information about the production of trout feed is beyond the scope of activities of our organization, which specializes in low-input culture of warm-water species. Further, as you probably know, companies that specialize in feed manufacturing treat much of that valuable information as proprietary.

Depending on where you are located, but especially for those of you in the United States, your nearest extension agent may have information on this topic. You can find a National Sea Grant extension specialist by visiting http://seagrant.noaa.gov/extension.

MyGAA, part of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/), offers discussion forums for members and can connect you to a network of aquaculture experts.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

I am looking for a source to purchase tilapia seed on the Asian subcontinent.

We don’t have specific information about sources of tilapia seed in Asia. You may have luck in contacting the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA). NACA's website (http://www.enaca.org/) may be a place to get some information and leads on suppliers. In addition, MyGAA, part of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/), offers discussion forums for members and can connect you to a network of aquaculture experts.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with AquaFish. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by AquaFish, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)